CFP – Law, Gender & Citizenship: Contemporary Issues for American Indians and American Immigrants

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The Wisconsin Journal of

Law, Gender & Society

Announces its 2010 Symposium:

Law, Gender and Citizenship:

Contemporary Issues for American Indians and American Immigrants

March 5, 2010

University of Wisconsin Law School

Madison, Wisconsin

The student editors of the Wisconsin Journal of Law, Gender & Society seek original scholarship, from both scholars and practitioners, that addresses the intersections of law and gender in the daily lives of two populations, each of which occupies a unique space in American law: American Indians and Immigrants.   Interested parties should send an abstract to WJLGS.Symposium@gmail.com by November 15, 2009.   Those selected for the Symposium will be notified in early January 2010.   The Journal’s Symposium issue will be published in Winter 2010.

Questions can be addressed to Symposium Editor Dan Lewerenz, danlewerenz@gmail.com, or Deputy Symposium Editor Kate Frigo, kate.frigo@gmail.com.

***

In response to my question, Mr. Lewerenz clarifies via e-mail (reprinted with permission) that the call refers to:

the indigenous peoples of the United States.   In both legal practice and scholarship, ‘Indian’ and ‘American Indian’ are almost always preferred over ‘Native American’ because most of the primary legal sources (e.g., the Constitution’s Indian commerce and treaty clauses, the Indian Reorganization Act, the Indian Self-Determination Act, the Indian Child Welfare Act) use ‘Indian.’   (But see, e.g., the Native American Arts and Crafts Act, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act.)   The body of law is generally referred to as ‘Indian Law.’

-Bridget Crawford

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